Big Picture Science – Sounds Abound: Laura Dilley

by Gary Niederhoff on August 2, 2013

Sounds Abound: Laura Dilley
Part 4 of Sounds Abound, featuring Laura Dilley, assistant professor in the Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders, Michigan State University, discussing the controversy behind the first words spoken on the surface of the moon.
(TRT 4:48)

{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

avatar Andrew Planet August 16, 2013 at 3:45 pm

It matters a lot actually whether Neil said ”Man” as in the collective species, or ”a man” as in himself.

I got very influenced and totally brain trained by a BBC radio broadcast I heard alone as a child that questioned whether we ought to call our species Human instead of Man. Young as I was then, after the broadcast, the maths of the question seemed straight forward as I worked it out writing on a piece of scrap paper. The word human was encompassing of both sexes but the word man was not. I thought then it was the only correct descriptive term to use as it would not seem fair to use the term for a single sex to describe both.

I’ve been of the same mind since and even worked out much more on the matter of which I could write about for ages. I had to come to the sensible conclusion and put into words that a truly objective intellect is asexual in that women have the same ability to learn from books as men do. That is, taking into account the healthy personal subjectivity experienced in being affably human. My opinion has been further buttressed by the results of exam tests in modern schools by both sexes.

Gosh, that TV broadcast of the moon must have really influenced you at your birthday party Seth. I was only a few months old when it happened but I was told that I was in front of the TV when it did

avatar Andrew Planet August 16, 2013 at 4:08 pm

He must have said and meant ”a man,” anyway because he used the collective term Mankind after that. If he’d used Man as a collective term and then the other collective term Mankind it would have been a paradoxical misnomer. It makes complete sense in the way Neil said he said it.

avatar Tito Young August 27, 2013 at 7:33 am

If astronaut Neil Armstrong confessed to this, lets take it on a technical blip. The were pretty much still using test tubes in those days, we’re pretty much lucky he made it without a hitch.

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