Big Picture Science – The Me in Measles: Andrew Maynard / Accurate Data

March 1, 2015

Andrew Maynard / Accurate Data click to listen (trt 12:04) Part 4 of Skeptic Check: The Me in Measles, featuring Andrew Maynard, professor of environmental health science, and director of the Risk Science Center at the University of Michigan, suggesting that more accurate statistics would bolster the trustworthiness of data used to compare the risks […]

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Big Picture Science – The Me in Measles: Adam Korbitz / Risk Assessment

March 1, 2015

Adam Korbitz / Risk Assessment click to listen (trt 6:02) Part 3 of Skeptic Check: The Me in Measles, featuring Adam Korbitz, a lawyer specializing in space law, discussing the psychology of how we assess risk.

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Big Picture Science – The Me in Measles: Neil deGrasse Tyson / Evaluating Risk

March 1, 2015

Neil deGrasse Tyson / Evaluating Risk click to listen (trt 5:40) Part 2 of Skeptic Check: The Me in Measles, featuring Neil deGrasse Tyson, astrophysicist, director of the Hayden Planetarium in New York City, explaining how we evaluate risk (or not) and how science can help.

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Big Picture Science – The Me in Measles: Paul Offit / Vaccine Facts and Fears

March 1, 2015

An 1802 editorial cartoon showing people erupting with “cow pox” after being vaccinated to treat small pox. Paul Offit / Vaccine Facts and Fears click to listen (trt 13:32) Part 1 of Skeptic Check: The Me in Measles, featuring Paul Offit, infectious disease specialist at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, discussing the facts and fears […]

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Big Picture Science – Surviving the Anthropocene

February 22, 2015

Big Picture Science – Surviving the Anthropocene The world is hot, and getting hotter. But higher temperatures aren’t the only impact our species is having on mother Earth. Urbanization, deforestation, and dumping millions of tons of plastic into the oceans … these are all ways in which humans are leaving their mark. So are we […]

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Big Picture Science – Surviving the Anthropocene: Gaia Vince / Adaptation

February 22, 2015

Glacier growing is a method employed in the Himalayas wherein runoff and ice chunks are used to help build onto existing glaciers. Gaia Vince / Adaptation click to listen (trt 11:53) Part 4 of Surviving the Anthropocene, featuring Gaia Vince, writer, broadcaster, former editor for New Scientist, news editor of Nature, and author of Adventures […]

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Big Picture Science – Surviving the Anthropocene: Francisco Valero / DSCOVR

February 22, 2015

Francisco Valero / DSCOVR click to listen (trt 8:30) Part 3 of Surviving the Anthropocene, featuring Francisco Valero, emeritus physicist and research scientist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, imparting the history of the recently launched DSCOVR satellite and its mission to collect climate data.

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Big Picture Science – Surviving the Anthropocene: David Grinspoon / Biological Inevitability

February 22, 2015

Humans aren’t the first species to influence the earth’s climate. 2.5 billion years ago, the solar gluttony of cyanobacteria and resulting flood of oxygen emissions led to what is known as the Great Oxygenation Event. David Grinspoon / Biological Inevitability click to listen (trt 8:04) Part 2 of Surviving the Anthropocene, featuring David Grinspoon, astrobiologist […]

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Big Picture Science – Surviving the Anthropocene: Jonathan Amos / Human Influence

February 22, 2015

Jonathan Amos / Human Influence click to listen (trt 8:05) Part 1 of Surviving the Anthropocene, featuring Jonathan Amos, science writer for the BBC in London, discussing climate scientists’ predictions of a mega-drought in the American Southwest, and the new higher measurements of the amount of plastic dumped into the oceans annually.

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Big Picture Science – Sesquicentennial Science

February 15, 2015

Big Picture Science – Sesquicentennial Science Today, scientists are familiar to us, but they weren’t always. Even the word “scientist” is relatively modern, dating from the Victorian Era. And it is to that era we turn as we travel to the University of Notre Dame to celebrate the 150th anniversary of its College of Science […]

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